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Danish Christmas Day Rice Pudding with Cherry Sauce Recipe (Risalamande)

In Denmark, many Danes end Christmas Day dinner with an almond and rice pudding dessert with cherry sauce called Risalamande (pronounced rees-sil-lā-mon-de. ) Actually you can make and eat Risalamande any time of the year but it is often associated with Christmas because one of the ingredients in Risalamande is a rice porridge called Risengrød (pronounced risen-groo with a hint of a d sound at the end) which again, you can eat any time of the year. It is a tradition to serve Risengrød as part of Christmas Eve dinner and put some outside for the gnomes (similar to bribing Santa Claus with cookies and milk.) If you don’t thank the gnomes (Nisse in Danish, Tomte in other Scandinavian countries) for protecting the family from harm with a bowl of porridge on Christmas Eve, the nisser (plural for nisse) will get mad and play tricks on you.  But you don’t want to give all of the leftover porridge to the gnomes! By the time Christmas day rolls around, the nisser should be fat and happy a

Stocked Up on Stock

It's surprising what you find shoved in the back of your freezer.

Apparently our holidays were a homemade stock making frenzy.

  
  • I called dibs on the Thanksgiving turkey carcass at my mom’s house.

  • Husband and I made a roast chicken for a gathering. We normally don’t do a whole chicken for just the two of us. If we go that direction, it is with Cornish game hens.

  • Husband and I made a corned beef brisket in the crock pot to eat during a wine review.

Husband made his famous Crock pot Stock with the chicken and turkey carcasses. Husband’s stock always tastes better than mine even when I follow his recipe. Most likely because I crowned him The King of Homemade Stock the first time he made it.

Royal titles make everything taste better.

Not to be outdone (sorta), I refrigerated the crockpot juices leftover from the corned beef brisket overnight so the fat would rise to the top of container. That makes it easy to skim the fat off the top the next morning.

To strain the extra bits of fat and such, I used a reusable coffee filter (from our old coffeemaker that I keep for this purpose) to strain the liquid. The flavor stays but the fat does not.




I always freeze homemade stock in one cup increments because most recipes call for one cup of stock.



I am surprised to learn I have17 cups of homemade turkey, chicken and corned beef stock that fell out of the freezer onto my head before I reorganized the freezer.

Who wants soup?

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Comments

Diana said…
We have a coffee filter for straining too - it's such a useful tool!

I decided not to take over the freezer with stock, so I've been pressure canning mine. Homemade stock is the best.