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The Best Time to Buy Everything at its Lowest Price

I used to think that saving money by seasonal shopping was grocery shopping at farmer’s markets in the summer, buying pumpkins in the fall, and not something I could not do the six months out of the year where nothing grows locally during the winter.   It wasn’t until I wrote a monthly What Goes On Sale and What to Buy on Clearance series that I realized I couldn’t have been more wrong.   I learned that almost everything from food to household goods to cars has a time of the year where it goes on sale because: There is a seasonal abundance (like fresh produce) The store has some of  last season's stock left in storage and wants to make room for the current season There is on end of season clearance to make room for next season’s goods on the store shelves There is a sale due to a celebrating an industry month (such as National Craft Month, National Camping Month, national holidays,etc.) There is a mega

Stocked Up on Stock

It's surprising what you find shoved in the back of your freezer.

Apparently our holidays were a homemade stock making frenzy.

  
  • I called dibs on the Thanksgiving turkey carcass at my mom’s house.

  • Husband and I made a roast chicken for a gathering. We normally don’t do a whole chicken for just the two of us. If we go that direction, it is with Cornish game hens.

  • Husband and I made a corned beef brisket in the crock pot to eat during a wine review.

Husband made his famous Crock pot Stock with the chicken and turkey carcasses. Husband’s stock always tastes better than mine even when I follow his recipe. Most likely because I crowned him The King of Homemade Stock the first time he made it.

Royal titles make everything taste better.

Not to be outdone (sorta), I refrigerated the crockpot juices leftover from the corned beef brisket overnight so the fat would rise to the top of container. That makes it easy to skim the fat off the top the next morning.

To strain the extra bits of fat and such, I used a reusable coffee filter (from our old coffeemaker that I keep for this purpose) to strain the liquid. The flavor stays but the fat does not.




I always freeze homemade stock in one cup increments because most recipes call for one cup of stock.



I am surprised to learn I have17 cups of homemade turkey, chicken and corned beef stock that fell out of the freezer onto my head before I reorganized the freezer.

Who wants soup?

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Comments

Diana said…
We have a coffee filter for straining too - it's such a useful tool!

I decided not to take over the freezer with stock, so I've been pressure canning mine. Homemade stock is the best.