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What is a Grocery Store Loss Leader? How Does it Save Money on Groceries?

When I got on out on my own in the big bad world, I quickly learned that things cost money.  Shocking, I know.  I wanted to learn how to save money and eagerly dove in to read what everyone considers the epic and all time frugal living and money saving guidebook The Tightwad Gazette by Amy Dacyczyn (you can learn more about it here.) ( Disclosure: I am including affiliate links for your convenience .)  Despite the preachy tone in the later chapters of the book (when you can tell she admitted to be burned out on writing her newsletter in the 90’s) and a few of the now outdated tips (floppy disks!) there are still some decent frugal hacks in her book that are useful today.  For example, Dacyczyn’s  (she pronounces it like Decision )  greatest money saving tip is how to save money on groceries by only buying the Loss Leaders.  Only problem is Dacyczyn doesn’t tell you what  a loss leader is and how to find them in the  store.   Save this money saving idea to your Pinterest boards f

Stocked Up on Stock

It's surprising what you find shoved in the back of your freezer.

Apparently our holidays were a homemade stock making frenzy.

  
  • I called dibs on the Thanksgiving turkey carcass at my mom’s house.

  • Husband and I made a roast chicken for a gathering. We normally don’t do a whole chicken for just the two of us. If we go that direction, it is with Cornish game hens.

  • Husband and I made a corned beef brisket in the crock pot to eat during a wine review.

Husband made his famous Crock pot Stock with the chicken and turkey carcasses. Husband’s stock always tastes better than mine even when I follow his recipe. Most likely because I crowned him The King of Homemade Stock the first time he made it.

Royal titles make everything taste better.

Not to be outdone (sorta), I refrigerated the crockpot juices leftover from the corned beef brisket overnight so the fat would rise to the top of container. That makes it easy to skim the fat off the top the next morning.

To strain the extra bits of fat and such, I used a reusable coffee filter (from our old coffeemaker that I keep for this purpose) to strain the liquid. The flavor stays but the fat does not.




I always freeze homemade stock in one cup increments because most recipes call for one cup of stock.



I am surprised to learn I have17 cups of homemade turkey, chicken and corned beef stock that fell out of the freezer onto my head before I reorganized the freezer.

Who wants soup?

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Comments

Diana said…
We have a coffee filter for straining too - it's such a useful tool!

I decided not to take over the freezer with stock, so I've been pressure canning mine. Homemade stock is the best.